Changes between Version 30 and Version 31 of Status/May11


Ignore:
Timestamp:
May 2, 2011 8:41:43 AM (4 years ago)
Author:
simonpj
Comment:

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  • Status/May11

    v30 v31  
    8989 * '''Jeff Epstein''', in collaboration with Andrew Black, has implemented a library that brings Erlang's programming model to Haskell programmers.  In particular, you can write a Haskell program that runs on a cluster of machines that do not share memory.  It is all based on a modest but powerful language extension that makes it possible for a programmer to work with "static" functions; that is, ones consisting of pure code with no free variables.  The paper that describes all this is called "Haskell for the cloud" [[http://research.microsoft.com/~simonpj/papers/parallel/ Cloud]]. 
    9090 
    91  * '''Max Bolingbroke''' continues his !PhD work on supercompilation, with a nice new paper [[http://research.microsoft.com/~simonpj/papers/supercompilation/ ImprovingSupercompilation]].  The plan is to make his supercompiler part of GHC, over the next year or so. 
     91 * '''Max Bolingbroke''' continues his PhD work on supercompilation, with a nice new paper [[http://research.microsoft.com/~simonpj/papers/supercompilation/ ImprovingSupercompilation]].  The plan is to make his supercompiler part of GHC, over the next year or so. 
    9292  
    9393 * '''David Terei''' at Stanford is busy implementing '''[http://hackage.haskell.org/trac/ghc/wiki/SafeHaskell Safe Haskell]''', a flag for GHC that will guarantee that your program has certain properties such as referential transparency and constructor access control, while still having the same semantics as it normally would. The flag basically allows you to trust the types of your program, giving you if you will a more 'pure' version of Haskell where 'unsafePerformIO' is outlawed, abstract data types are actually abstract and safety is provided by the compiler not the user. This is being done as part of a larger project by the [http://www.scs.stanford.edu/ Stanford Secure Computing Systems] group involving the use of dynamic information flow based security in Haskell to build a secure web framework that allows the inclusion of third party untrusted code.